Reduce Nutrient Runoff

Keeping Nutrients on the LandOhio farm field and buildings

One of the biggest contributors to harmful algal blooms (HABs) in lakes is excess nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus) from farms and cities upstream. Ohio State and partners are developing and sharing the most effective methods, technologies and practices that help to reduce the overall load of both sediment and nutrients entering tributary watersheds.  These include ways to measure nutrients in the field and in immediate tributary waters; ways to harvest excess nutrients before they leach into water; and ways that communities can figure out the most beneficial combination of management practices to keep nutrients in place.

Projects

Field to Faucet Funded Projects

New field sensors will quickly scan for multiple algal toxins in water, food
A new sensor under development at The Ohio State University will detect harmful substances in water or food much more quickly than current methods. Lead: Wu Lu, Ohio State University. Read more...

Manure treatment: Research Aims to Take the P and N out of Livestock Waste
A new technology under development at The Ohio State University is designed to use manure in a more environmentally friendly way.Lead: Yebo Li, Ohio State University. Read more...

New App Project Seeks to Help Farmers Manage Farm Nutrients
Want to gain access to timely nutrient use and application information at the farm level? Researchers are The Ohio State University soon will have an App for that. Lead: John Fulton, Ohio State University. Read more...

Ohio Department of Higher Education Funded Projects

What Really Works? Reducing Dissolved Reactive Phosphorus
Ohio researchers are working to identify the best strategies to reduce phosphorus from farm fields to improve the overall health of Lake Erie. Lead: Laura Johnson, Heidelberg University. Read more...

A New Consortium To Ensure Water Quality
A partnership of stakeholders will take water quality sampling--and water quality improvement--into their own hands. Lead: Greg Labarge, Ohio State University. Read more...

Comparing the options for reducing nutrient runoff
New research at Ohio State researcher helps land and water managers gauge the nutrient impacts of potential actions. Timothy Haab, Ohio State University. Read more...

Mapping the social landscape for stronger water quality ties
New research at Kent State University will make community water quality collaborations a little easier by mapping connections between groups with a stake in the Lake Erie watershed. Lead: V. Kelly Turner, Kent State University. Read more...