Ohio Board of Regents Projects

Ohio Department of Higher Education Funded Projects

Background

Crafted in partnership with F2F, a closely aligned group of 18 projects funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education in 2015 seek near-term solutions to HABs issues in Lake Erie. Eight Ohio universities collaborated on these projects, including Bowling Green State University, Central State University, the University of Cincinnati, Defiance College, Heidelberg University, Kent State University, The Ohio State University and the University of Toledo. Ohio Sea Grant manages project funding for the research, including $2 million from the Ohio Department of Higher Education and over $2 million in cost-share from partner universities. The projects are overseen by an advisory board with representatives from key Ohio agencies including Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Ohio Department of Agriculture and Ohio Department of Health.

Projects

Smarter charcoal use: guidance for water treatment plants during algal bloom season
Research in progress at The Ohio State University and the University of Toledo aims to provide guidance on how water treatment plants can most effectively remove harmful algal toxins from drinking water. Lead: John Lenhart, Ohio State University. Read more...

Mapping the social landscape for stronger water quality ties
New research at Kent State University will make community water quality collaborations a little easier by mapping connections between groups with a stake in the Lake Erie watershed. Lead: V. Kelly Turner, Kent State University. Read more...

Toxin-eating bacteria naturally thrive near harmful algal blooms
Kent State University researchers are studying whether bacteria found in Lake Erie waters and sediments could be used to remove harmful algal toxins from drinking water. Lead: Xiaozhen Mou, Kent State University. Read more...

Developing techniques to measure harmful algal toxins in the human body
Researchers at the University of Toledo are developing a method to detect microcystin compounds in human tissue. Lead: Kenneth Hensley, University of Toledo. Read more...

A New Consortium To Ensure Water Quality
A partnership of stakeholders will take water quality sampling--and water quality improvement--into their own hands. Lead: Greg Labarge, Ohio State University. Read more...

Guidance for Regulators On Fish And Produce During Algal Bloom Season
A team of Ohio State researchers is helping to determine whether certain foods like fish and irrigated produce are safe to eat during Lake Erie’s harmful algal bloom season. Lead: Stuart Ludsin, Ohio State University. Read more...

“Radar” for harmful algal blooms will give early warning to lake communities: Maumee Bay
New research will make it easier for communities and water managers to prepare for harmful algal blooms that could affect drinking water near Maumee Bay. Lead: Thomas Bridgeman, University of Toledo; George Bullerjahn, Bowling Green State University. Read more...

“Radar” for harmful algal blooms will give early warning to lake communities: Sandusky Bay
New research will make it easier for communities and water managers to prepare for harmful algal blooms that could affect drinking water near Sandusky Bay. Lead: George Bullerjahn, Bowling Green State University. Read more...

A one-stop shop for making water-friendly decisions for Lake Erie
A project at the University of Toledo will put information on Lake Erie harmful algal blooms into one place for easy access by community members and leaders. Lead: Patrick Lawrence, University of Toledo. Read more...

Comparing the options for reducing nutrient runoff
New research at Ohio State researcher helps land and water managers gauge the nutrient impacts of potential actions. Timothy Haab, Ohio State University. Read more...

Microcystin Risks for Liver Patients
New research at the University of Toledo will shed light on the potential liver damage that toxins from harmful algal blooms can do—and how to avoid it. Lead: Thomas Sodeman, University of Toledo. Read more...

Do algal blooms lead to cancer?
Research investigates the role of the algal toxin microcystin in the development of liver cancer. Lead: Christopher Weghorst, Ohio State University. Read more...

What Really Works? Reducing Dissolved Reactive Phosphorus
Ohio researchers are working to identify the best strategies to reduce phosphorus from farm fields to improve the overall health of Lake Erie. Lead: Laura Johnson, Heidelberg University. Read more...

Researchers rule out lurking toxins before giving the “all clear” after an algal bloom event
New research will examine whether toxins from harmful algal blooms stick to water infrastructure like pipes and storage tanks—and therefore stick around in drinking water longer than expected. Lead: Isabel Escobar, University of Toledo. Read more...

New weapons for water treatment plants dealing with harmful algal blooms
Research at the University of Toledo and The Ohio State University will create low-cost, effective treatments for algal toxins often found in drinking water drawn from Lake Erie. Isabel Escobar, University of Toledo. Read more...

Helpful bacteria clear algal toxins out of drinking water
Researchers at the University of Toledo are putting toxin-eating bacteria to work purifying water. Jason Huntley, University of Toledo. Read more...

Using a virus to battle bacteria
New research at Ohio State investigates an environmentally friendly way to reduce microcystins in both lake water and water treatment plants.
Lead: Jiyoung Lee, Ohio State University. Read more...